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What kind of criminal background makes someone ineligible to serve on a jury?

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A person is ineligible to serve if the person has had rights and privileges withdrawn and not yet restored under ORS 137.281.  ORS 137.281 explains that someone’s rights and privileges, including that of being a juror, are withdrawn if the person has been sentenced to incarceration in a county jail, a state prison, or a federal prison because of a felony sentence, and

  • the conviction has not been set aside or
  • the person has not been discharged.

If the conviction is later set aside or once the person is discharged, the person can serve

  • on a civil trial jury,
  • on a criminal trial jury or a grand jury, if enough time has passed.  (See below.)

ORS 10.030 (3)(a)(E) and (f) say that a person cannot serve on a criminal trial jury or on a grand jury if the person has been

  • convicted of a felony or served a felony sentence within the 15 years immediately preceding the date the person is required to report for jury service; or
  • convicted of a misdemeanor involving violence or dishonesty, or has served a misdemeanor sentence based on a misdemeanor involving violence or dishonesty, within the five years immediately preceding the date the person is required to report for jury service.

ORS 10.030(3)(b)(A) defines “felony sentence” as any incarceration, post-prison supervision, parole or probation imposed upon conviction of a felony or served as a result of conviction of a felony. 

ORS 10.030(3)(b)(A) defines “misdemeanor sentence” as any incarceration or probation imposed upon conviction of a misdemeanor or served as a result of conviction of a misdemeanor. 

ORS 166.270 defines “Has been convicted of a felony.”